Browse Prior Art Database

Traffic Controller Tone Multiplexing System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095849D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Druckerman, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

A plurality of remote stations is controlled and monitored from a master computer by time and tone division. The system has particular utility for operating local intersection traffic controllers, a typical controller being shown. For exemplary purposes only, assume that the master computer utilizes ten tones F1... F10 to individually address each of eighty local controllers every second.

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Traffic Controller Tone Multiplexing System

A plurality of remote stations is controlled and monitored from a master computer by time and tone division. The system has particular utility for operating local intersection traffic controllers, a typical controller being shown. For exemplary purposes only, assume that the master computer utilizes ten tones F1... F10 to individually address each of eighty local controllers every second.

To initiate each control cycle, the computer places a master reset tone F10 upon outbound lines 11 and 12 which can be a single line with a ground return. Narrow band filter 14 passes F10 to reset 20-stage counter 15. Subsequently, counter advance tone F9 is sent and passed by narrow band filter 16 for advancing the count in 15. Concurrently with tone F9, various combinations of function tones F1... F8 are sent. The address of each controller comprises the presence of one or both of a discrete pair of the eight function tones during a particular one of the twenty output pulses from the computer each second. Thus, four controllers can be individually but concurrently addressed during each output pulse. Thus, narrow band filters 17 and 18 pass F1 and F2, respectively and, when the count in 15 has reached a preselected magnitude, a pulse from 15 enables binary decoder 20 to sense the presence of either F1 or F2 or both. If only F1 is present, a Go Green signal appears at terminal 21. The presence of only F2 causes a Go Red signal at 22.

When both F1 and F2 are present and 15 has actuated 20, monitor signals are returned to the computer by return lines 23 and 24. This is accomplished by enabling gate 25, if the traffic signal is...