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Browse Prior Art Database

Making Printed Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095868D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Funari, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

In this method, minute balls of malleable metal are coated with a thin outer layer of insulation. These coated balls are then molded or bonded together into a desired solid shape to provide a basically dielectric member. The insulation is broken in a manner such as, e. g., by scratching, burnishing, drilling or punching. This causes the malleable metal to be cold welded into a desired continuous line or hole-defining surface to produce a conductor of desired pattern or configuration.

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Making Printed Circuits

In this method, minute balls of malleable metal are coated with a thin outer layer of insulation. These coated balls are then molded or bonded together into a desired solid shape to provide a basically dielectric member. The insulation is broken in a manner such as, e. g., by scratching, burnishing, drilling or punching. This causes the malleable metal to be cold welded into a desired continuous line or hole-defining surface to produce a conductor of desired pattern or configuration.

The malleable metal can be spheres of copper, tin-lead, or solder, preferably as small as possible. The insulation can be adhesive coating of plastic or epoxy. The spheres can be made separately and then mixed with epoxy. Alternatively, a high-viscosity epoxy can be mixed with a suitable metal and stirred vigorously to cause such metal to break up into small balls because of its high surface tension.

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