Browse Prior Art Database

Microelectronic Packaging Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095920D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schneider, EM: AUTHOR

Abstract

This process is based on the microelectronic packaging technique described in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, March 1964, Volume 6, No. 10, page 70. This process improves the yield in attaching modules to one another. The difference in terminal lengths which influences module interconnection is eliminated in this process.

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Microelectronic Packaging Process

This process is based on the microelectronic packaging technique described in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, March 1964, Volume 6, No. 10, page 70. This process improves the yield in attaching modules to one another. The difference in terminal lengths which influences module interconnection is eliminated in this process.

A plurality of modules 10 is interconnected through terminal members 16 having head portions 20. Conventionally, the head portions and terminals are coated with solder. When terminals 16 and head portions 20 are placed in contact with one another, a good solder joint is established in a solder reflow process. In some cases, however, terminal lengths are different, resulting in some solder reflow joints not being formed.

This process overcomes this limitation by coating each terminal with a solder paste so that the extra paste takes up differences in length among the various terminal pins. When the modules are stacked one upon another, the extra paste, on the shorter length terminals, closes the gap and establish a good mechanical connection. The extra paste on the terminals of correct length aids in the establishment of a stronger solder reflow joint.

The upper module is dipped to at least 1/16" depth in a paste such as Fusion Engineering E360-HR or E-495 manufactured by Fusion Engineering Company, Cleveland, Ohio. After dipping, the upper module is carefully placed on the head portion of the lower module. Th...