Browse Prior Art Database

Inverter Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095933D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greer, WM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This circuit uses directional transmission line coupling techniques to provide a signal-controlled inverter circuit.

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Inverter Circuit

This circuit uses directional transmission line coupling techniques to provide a signal-controlled inverter circuit.

A directional coupler including strip lines 1 and 2, having a coupled length T1 is employed. The coupler is such that energy traveling from left to right in line 1 is coupled into line 2 in the opposite direction so as to travel from right to left. Line 2 is terminated at both ends B and D in its characteristic impedance ZO. Line 1 has at its end C, electronic switch 3 which is effective in response to a control signal, to either short the line to the common ground, or effectively open-circuit the line. The device 3 can be any suitable switching device having a very low on impedance.

Inverter operation is achieved when switch 3 is closed to short line 1 to ground. A positive pulse introduced at A travels through line 1 to point C. As the pulse progresses through the coupled region, a signal is directionally coupled into line 2 to appear at point B. End B is terminated in ZO, so no reflections are produced by the coupled signal.

When the pulse in line 1 reaches shorted end C, a negative pulse is reflected back up the line, since a shorted transmission line has a reflection coefficient of - 1. The negative pulse traveling back along line 1 is directionally coupled into line 2 as a negative pulse traveling to end D. This negative pulse appears at the output terminal as an inversion of the positive pulse applied at A.

When no inversion...