Browse Prior Art Database

Dual Channel Recorder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095936D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pulford, SR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Because of the very large amounts of data to be handled in a radar processing system, such as when used for mapping purposes, for example, and the high rate of receipt of the data in real-time, resort is frequently taken to some sort of data compression technique. One such usual technique involves optical display and high resolution photographic recording of the display as a part of the processing. A problem inherent in this is that the radar return information cannot be displayed in a single trace on a cathode ray tube without sacrificing the high resolution necessary for the subsequent optical processing.

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Dual Channel Recorder

Because of the very large amounts of data to be handled in a radar processing system, such as when used for mapping purposes, for example, and the high rate of receipt of the data in real-time, resort is frequently taken to some sort of data compression technique. One such usual technique involves optical display and high resolution photographic recording of the display as a part of the processing. A problem inherent in this is that the radar return information cannot be displayed in a single trace on a cathode ray tube without sacrificing the high resolution necessary for the subsequent optical processing.

This problem is overcome by displaying a total group of radar returns, indicated as the incoming signals A-B, in two separate traces A and B on the CRT. Signals A are the first occurring in time and are selectively delayed so that signals B can be simultaneously displayed on the same CRT. Depending upon other system requirements, it may be necessary, and this technique so permits, to provide three, four or even more such simultaneous displays.

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