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Cathode Sputtering of Fine Line

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095941D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Maissel, LI: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the formation of fine line cavities or apertures by conventional chemical or etching techniques, problems are encountered such as undercutting, which is shown in C. These difficulties are avoided with the described cathode sputtering process.

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Cathode Sputtering of Fine Line

In the formation of fine line cavities or apertures by conventional chemical or etching techniques, problems are encountered such as undercutting, which is shown in C. These difficulties are avoided with the described cathode sputtering process.

Metal member 8, shown in B, is placed upon the surface of glass substrate 6. Metal mask 10 is selectively applied to the surface of member 8. Mask 10 is desirably aluminum, particularly where copper is the metal body in which the fine lines are to be formed. Aluminum is advantageous since it readily forms an oxide in a slight oxidizing atmosphere. The thickness of the oxide is not sufficient to cause the masking medium to act as an insulation. It has the further advantage of sputtering at a lower rate than member 8, which is advantageous as used here. Where semiconductors or insulators are bombarded in this fashion, carbon and glass are desirable masks.

Assembly 22, including substrate 6, member 8, and mask 10, is placed upon the face of electrode 2 housed in a cathode sputtering apparatus, generally shown as 20, in drawing A. In parallel spaced relation to cathode 2 is anode 4. Positioned within cathode 2 and anode 4 is shutter 12 which is mounted upon movable shaft 14, permitting rotation of shutter 12 away from the face of cathode 2 and anode 4. Cathode 2 and anode 4 are enclosed by bell jar 13 which is mounted upon base 15. This includes two ports 24 and 26. Port 24 is joined to conduit 24a through which gaseous material, such as argon or its ionized particle, are injected. Port 26 is joined to a conduit 26a which, in turn, is coupled to valve 26b, and which, in turn, is connected to vacuum pump 26c.

In the cathodic s...