Browse Prior Art Database

Scope Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095957D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heitzman, ET: AUTHOR

Abstract

In present circuit technology, the terminal pins are very often located on close centers making testing by a normal probe difficult. This probe is for testing closely spaced terminals.

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Scope Probe

In present circuit technology, the terminal pins are very often located on close centers making testing by a normal probe difficult. This probe is for testing closely spaced terminals.

The probe has two handles 10 and 11 with jaws 12 and 14. Spring 15 maintains the handles separated and the jaws open. Jaw 12 has a contact 16 that is connected through an isolation circuit to a coaxial cable.

In operation, handles 10 and 11 are forced together bringing jaws 12 and 14 to their smallest dimension to permit the probe to be inserted between two terminal pins 17 and 18. Upon release of the handles, contact 16 engages pin 17 and jaw 14 contacts pin 18. Spring 15 effects sufficient pressure through the handles to hold the jaws in frictional contact with the pins and complete a circuit through pin 17 and contact 16. A ground clip 20 is provided.

By the use of two jaws, one on each pin. the weight of the probe and the combined holding pressure generated by the spring is distributed. Thus, one pin only does not bear the load. Since the upper jaw engages and does not grip the pin, the probe can be used with wire wrap connections.

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