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Pneumatic Oscillator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096007D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Van Den Honert, TH: AUTHOR

Abstract

This mechanical oscillator of constant frequency has a pneumatic drive and produces a series of pneumatic pressure pulses. These can be used for clocking a pneumatic digital system. The oscillator features simple construction, adjustability of frequency, and independence of supply pressure variations. It is based on the principle that the frequency of an oscillating body supported by a spring depends only on the mass and the spring rate.

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Pneumatic Oscillator

This mechanical oscillator of constant frequency has a pneumatic drive and produces a series of pneumatic pressure pulses. These can be used for clocking a pneumatic digital system. The oscillator features simple construction, adjustability of frequency, and independence of supply pressure variations. It is based on the principle that the frequency of an oscillating body supported by a spring depends only on the mass and the spring rate.

The oscillator comprises two pistons which are rigidly interconnected and are movable within a cylindrical cavity. The piston assembly is biased by two helical springs. Between the pistons there is a cylindrical sleeve freely movable over a short distance, relative to the pistons. The opposite inner surfaces of the pistons are concave. A pressure supply line is connected with two slanted inlet apertures in the wall of the cavity, opposite to two slanted outlet apertures. In the equilibrium position of the pistons, both inlets and outlets are tangential to the concave surfaces of the pistons.

Oscillations are started by a pressure pulse applied by devices, not shown, at one end of the cavity. The oscillations build up and are maintained because the mass is being impulsed in the direction of its velocity each time it passes the equilibrium position. The relative position of the sleeve is governed by its inertia. Thus, if the mass moves through the center position from right to left, the sleeve is on the extreme...