Browse Prior Art Database

Image orienting System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096017D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hopkins, HH: AUTHOR

Abstract

The optical system shown in its two adjustable positions effects image rotation and reversal without loss of focus, change of magnification, or lateral shift of the image so as to compensate for any of the possible orientations of the object.

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Image orienting System

The optical system shown in its two adjustable positions effects image rotation and reversal without loss of focus, change of magnification, or lateral shift of the image so as to compensate for any of the possible orientations of the object.

Object O, a transparency, can be inserted in its holder with either surface facing the screen, and, if square, rotated about the optical axis in any one of four positions. The image rotating prism P compensates for rotation of the object. The mirror system consisting of mirrors M1... M4 provides for selective direct or reverse imaging of the object upon screen S.

In the lower drawing, object O is directly imaged upon screen S by lens L after four seriate reflections by mirrors M1... M4. For ease of understanding, these mirrors can be thought of as occupying the respective pieces A, C, D, E of a parallel-piped. The optical path length, therefore, equals the sum of the distances AC + CD + DE.

In the upper drawing, object O is reversibly imaged upon screen S by lens L after three seriate reflections by mirrors M1, M3, and M4. Mirror M1 now occupies position B on the optical axis of lens L, and mirror M3 is rotated about the axis DE to face point B. The optical path length remains constant, since the sum of :AB + BD + DE equals the same length as the prior path.

With equal optical path lengths and a reflected path along DE to mirror M4 and rectilinear reflection from it, constant magnification with no late...