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Amorphous Selenium as an Etch Resist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096055D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marinace, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A thin film, several microns or more, of amorphous Se can be vacuum evaporated relatively easily through a mechanical mask upon a substrate. A good vacuum is not necessary. The crucible temperature can be as low as 300 degrees C with a usefully rapid evaporation rate. As long as the substrate temperature remains cool, e. g., below 60 degrees C, during the minute or two deposition cycle, the film will be amorphous and not crystalline.

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Amorphous Selenium as an Etch Resist

A thin film, several microns or more, of amorphous Se can be vacuum evaporated relatively easily through a mechanical mask upon a substrate. A good vacuum is not necessary. The crucible temperature can be as low as 300 degrees C with a usefully rapid evaporation rate. As long as the substrate temperature remains cool, e. g., below 60 degrees C, during the minute or two deposition cycle, the film will be amorphous and not crystalline.

The amorphous Se maskant film resists significant attack by most acids, caustic and organic solvents, except for CS(2) in which it is slowly dissolved. Although this excellent masking is desirable, it would seem that removal of the mask would be prohibitively difficult. However, the mask can be easily removed by heating the substrate and evaporating off the Se. CS2 can be used for this purpose, but it would be slower.

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