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A Pressure Vessel for Preparing High Pressure Compounds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096065D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Woodall, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is a pressure vessel which permits the preparation of compounds with dissociation pressures of greater than one atmosphere. Materials of relatively large diameter can be obtained utilizing vessels of narrower wall thickness which are less expensive and more easily obtained than vessels of greater wall thickness.

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A Pressure Vessel for Preparing High Pressure Compounds

This is a pressure vessel which permits the preparation of compounds with dissociation pressures of greater than one atmosphere. Materials of relatively large diameter can be obtained utilizing vessels of narrower wall thickness which are less expensive and more easily obtained than vessels of greater wall thickness.

Preparing high pressure compounds in single-walled chambers generally restricts the maximum cross section of the material that can be made. This is due to the relationship between rupture stress and O. D./I. D. and wall thickness.

The cross section of a desired material can be increased by using pressure step-down chambers. It is necessary to choose a material with the right partial pressures. Inner cylindrical chamber 1 contains boat 2 with compound A at pressure P1 with or without a condensed phase disposed at the cool end of chamber 1. Outer chamber 3, completely surrounding chamber 1, contains a material whose partial pressure is very small at room temperature. Its partial pressure increases rapidly with increasing temperature. Thus, the pressure in chamber 1 is much greater than the pressure in chamber 3, when there are condensed phases in both chambers at a given temperature. When there are no condensed phases, the pressure in chamber 3 can be determined from the ideal gas law.

In the ordinary preparation of InP, which dissociates at 1065 degrees C at twenty-one atmospheres, the manufactur...