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Bouncing Ball Pulse Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096178D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gunn, JB: AUTHOR

Abstract

The pulse generator generate s extremely short pulses of large amplitude. The duration is approximately 3 x 10/10/ sec. and the amplitude 1. 5 x 10/3/V. The principle of operation consists in charging a small hard metal ball to a high potential and the discharging into a transmission line connected to the useful load. The switching actions required for charging and discharging employ sparks initiated by mechanical movements of the ball.

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Bouncing Ball Pulse Generator

The pulse generator generate s extremely short pulses of large amplitude. The duration is approximately 3 x 10/10/ sec. and the amplitude 1. 5 x 10/3/V. The principle of operation consists in charging a small hard metal ball to a high potential and the discharging into a transmission line connected to the useful load. The switching actions required for charging and discharging employ sparks initiated by mechanical movements of the ball.

In order to maintain rapid motion of the ball with small energy dissipation, it is bounced back and forth between the ends of cylindrical hard metal anvils which also form the contact electrodes.

The motion of the ball thus consists of periods of nearly constant velocity, while the ball is in free flight, separated by almost instantaneous reversals when it is bounced off the electrodes. One electrode, and the outer metal tube, form constant-impedance prolongations of the output coaxial transmission line. The other electrode is connected, through a high resistance, to a source of potential variable up to about 15kV.

On approaching the high-voltage electrode, the ball receives a charge which it retains after its velocity reversal until it comes near enough to the output electrode for a spark to pass. A short pulse of current is then delivered to the output line, forming the output pulse. The spark is an absolutely essential part of the mechanism. If it is eliminated, e. g., by operating in vacuo, the increase of capacitance between ball and output electrode results in the equality of their potentials at the instant of contact, and there is no sudden rise in current. Instead a very small current flows through the changing capacitance during the whole time of flight.

Motion may be imparted to the ball by making it of steel and applying a changing magnetic field gr...