Browse Prior Art Database

Millimeter Wave Search System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096199D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, CM: AUTHOR

Abstract

This electromechanical scanning system is for use in high-frequency communications. The system utilizes a Luneberg lens for a dual function: as the principal radiating element, and as an element to supply local oscillator power. The characteristic feature of a Luneberg lens is that it focuses a received electromagnetic wave upon its circumference. Such is at a position diametrically opposite to that from which the wave was received.

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Millimeter Wave Search System

This electromechanical scanning system is for use in high-frequency communications. The system utilizes a Luneberg lens for a dual function: as the principal radiating element, and as an element to supply local oscillator power. The characteristic feature of a Luneberg lens is that it focuses a received electromagnetic wave upon its circumference. Such is at a position diametrically opposite to that from which the wave was received.

One quadrant of the Luneberg lens is covered with microwave feed-line terminals. Each of the feed lines is coupled to an I-F manifold line through a mixer and I-F switch. The mixers are employed to translate downwardly the incoming signal frequency so that lower frequency switches can be used. Local oscillator power, which would normally be fed to each mixer through a power branching network, is supplied to all of the mixers. This is by using the Luneberg lens itself as the distributing element. To this end, a local oscillator is connected to a feed terminal. The latter is placed diametrically opposite to the receiving feedline terminals on the lens.

In operation, the switches would repeatedly be stepped through the entire sequence by sampling devices (not shown). At the same time the Luneberg lens would be continuously rotated about the vertical axis by a drive. This results in hemispherical scanning by the system. The received information is passed, via the common I-F line, to an I-F amplifier. The sign...