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Pulse Rejection Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096242D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clapper, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

. The arrangement is a pulse rejection circuit which accepts a saw-tooth or ramp function signal. It does not accept a square wave or steeply rising function. The circuit shows a pair of drivers used for conditioning an adaptive memory.

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Pulse Rejection Circuit

. The arrangement is a pulse rejection circuit which accepts a saw-tooth or ramp function signal. It does not accept a square wave or steeply rising function. The circuit shows a pair of drivers used for conditioning an adaptive memory.

An input source supplies a first input signal to a first driver circuit 1 via an input terminal 5 through an And comprising diodes D1, D2, D3 and load resistor 7. The inverse of the first signal is supplied to a second driver circuit 2 via an input terminal 9 to one diode D4 in an And comprising diodes D4, D5 and D6 and load resistor
10. The output of this And is supplied to the base of transistor X1.

Under the assumed conditions, X1 is cut off and diode D7 in its collector circuit conducts to keep transistor X2 conducting. Transistor X3 is normally conducting so the COND bar 1 output is at -6 volts initially, which is considered the off condition. The other inputs to the input And of the first driver are at 0 volts. Thus, transistor X4 is conductive, cutting off the current flow in diode D8. Under these conditions, transistor X5 starts to cut off but is prevented from cutting off completely because of current flow through diode D9 and capacitor Q1 connected to the collector of X5. This feedback via D9 and Q1 causes a saw-tooth or ramp function to be generated, rising at a predetermined rate from -6 volts to 0 volts.

After a short time interval, input signals supplied to the remaining inputs in the And connected to X4 cause the associated diode to conduct and cut off X4. This action allows current to flow in D8 and restores conduction in X5. Because of D9 in the feedback circuit, the capacitor is not effective to slow down the drop at the COND 1 output. The sharp drop which occurs at this output initiates the braking pulse to be supplied via the other output.

While the output from X5 rises, a displacement current flows in a small capacitor Q2 which does not appreciably change the voltage...