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Timing Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096275D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gruodis, AJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a timing circuit whose output remains at a given level as long as the period between successive input pulses is less than a predetermined time. It responds to a one-half nanosecond input pulse to produce a two second output pulse. The various waveforms occurring in the timing circuit in response to an input pulse are shown. A

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Timing Circuit

This is a timing circuit whose output remains at a given level as long as the period between successive input pulses is less than a predetermined time. It responds to a one-half nanosecond input pulse to produce a two second output pulse. The various waveforms occurring in the timing circuit in response to an input pulse are shown. A

An input pulse applied to conductor 1 simultaneously triggers T1 and T4 into conduction. The conduction of T4 causes the output to drop to substantially ground potential. The input pulse, being of very short duration, e. g., one-half nanosecond, soon disappears. However, at this time, capacitor C1, which was previously charged through diode D1 to ground potential, begins to discharge through the base emitter diode of transistor T1, tending to maintain it in conduction. The continued conduction of T1 maintains T2 in conduction. The positive potential on the collector of T2 is reflected through R3 to forwardly bias D6. Currents from R3 and R4 feed through diode D6 to the base electrode of T4, tending to maintain it in conduction after disappearance of the input pulse.

When capacitor C1 has discharged, T1 and T2 become nonconductive and the collector voltage of T2 shifts to -V. This negative voltage shift back biases diode D6 and is also reflected through R2 and C2 to T3 rendering it nonconductive. The resulting positive shift at the collector of T3 forwardly biases D7. The current path into the base of T4 shifts from the...