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Formation of TiO(2) Diodes by Reactive Sputtering

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096327D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Magill, PJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In contrast to the steam oxidation step employed for making titanium oxide diodes, described commencing on Page 4 of this issue, the following process employs reactive sputtering steps. In this process, a glow discharge tube is utilized in which the cathode is constituted of titanium metal and the anode of aluminum or similar material. A substrate, upon which is affixed a mask having parallel slots, is supported upon the anode of the glow discharge tube. Titanium strips are deposited by sputtering in the presence of an inert gas, for example, argon, through the slots of the mask. As an alternative step, the titanium strips can be deposited by vapor deposition. Following this step, the mask is re-oriented on the substrate to expose selected areas of the deposited titanium strips.

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Formation of TiO(2) Diodes by Reactive Sputtering

In contrast to the steam oxidation step employed for making titanium oxide diodes, described commencing on Page 4 of this issue, the following process employs reactive sputtering steps. In this process, a glow discharge tube is utilized in which the cathode is constituted of titanium metal and the anode of aluminum or similar material. A substrate, upon which is affixed a mask having parallel slots, is supported upon the anode of the glow discharge tube. Titanium strips are deposited by sputtering in the presence of an inert gas, for example, argon, through the slots of the mask. As an alternative step, the titanium strips can be deposited by vapor deposition. Following this step, the mask is re- oriented on the substrate to expose selected areas of the deposited titanium strips.

Reactive sputtering is performed in a partial pressure of water vapor. Simultaneously, the substrate is permitted to reach an elevated temperature. Consequently, a reduced oxide of TiO(2) is formed in the exposed areas. Subsequently, a counter electrode is applied by a technique such as sputtering, evaporation, etc.

An advantage of the sputtering process is that, due to the lower temperatures employed, a better substrate, for example, soft glass, can be used. There is also the further advantage that selective oxidation eliminates line resistance inherent in the diodes produced by the process described in article referred to.

By incorporat...