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Binary Number Sorter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096366D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Falkoff, AD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The drawing shows a sorter of binary numbers with arbitrarily selected examples of binary numbers represented at the left. Sorting is accomplished by comparing column values, beginning with the high-order column.

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Binary Number Sorter

The drawing shows a sorter of binary numbers with arbitrarily selected examples of binary numbers represented at the left. Sorting is accomplished by comparing column values, beginning with the high-order column.

The numbers to be sorted are stored in the Number Memory. Upon initiation of the sorting operation, the high-order bit of each number is examined first in the Comparator. Since the relative magnitude of binary numbers is established when they differ in value at the same column, numbers are temporarily eliminated from consideration when a difference is observed. Temporarily eliminated numbers are not further examined until the remaining numbers are examined and sorted. The Order of Elimination Memory notes at which column all numbers were eliminated. Numbers temporarily eliminated at the same level are examined at their lower-order stages only. This procedure is repeated in order for all groups eliminated, beginning with the group most recently eliminated.

The following specific example demonstrates the operation of the sorter. Assume that the sorting is to obtain the numbers from largest to smallest. Numbers n(2) and n(n) are eliminated when the 8 column is compared in the Comparator. Next, only n(1), n(3) and n(4) are compared at the 4 column and n(3) is immediately shown to be the highest number. The Order of Elimination Memory next initiates comparison of only n(1) and n(4) at the 2 column. Thus, n(4) is shown to be the next highe...