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High Density masks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096386D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Weed, DS: AUTHOR

Abstract

This mask, for use in fabrication of vacuum deposited devices, utilizes a parallel array of wires 10 to support the mask body 12 and to define the side edges of slots 14 and 16 in it.

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High Density masks

This mask, for use in fabrication of vacuum deposited devices, utilizes a parallel array of wires 10 to support the mask body 12 and to define the side edges of slots 14 and 16 in it.

The wires are mounted under tension by a frame 18, which together with the wires 10, makes up the skeleton of the mask. Typically, the wires can be two or three mils in diameter and spaced apart about eight mils, center-to-center. In the fabrication of the mask, the skeleton is dipped in a suitable photoresist so that all of the spaces between the wires are filled. Then, the photoresist is dried. A photo negative is positioned over the coated wire array so as to expose those portions 12 of the photoresist which are to form permanent parts of the mask.

The resist is then developed, so as to produce open areas 14, 16, etc., in the mask. These form the slots in the finished mask, through which, in use, evaporant can pass. Finally, the mask is vacuum baked to harden and out-gas the resist, and then it is ready for use. The wire skeletal parts not only provide strength to the mask but also form borders, e.g., 20 and 22, of the slots in the mask. Thus, the registration and quality of the photo negative does not have to be extremely good to produce the desired accuracy.

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