Browse Prior Art Database

Information Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096591D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

O'Neill, PJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Drawing A shows apparatus for use in the production of an information pattern. Drawing B shows a section through the apparatus. Narrow slits 6 are milled into one side of a transparent block 4. Slits 6 almost pass through the thickness of block 4 to form a multiplicity of separate compartments 9 of rectangular cross-section. The sides of slits 6 are left unpolished so that each compartment 9 is light tight.

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Information Patterns

Drawing A shows apparatus for use in the production of an information pattern. Drawing B shows a section through the apparatus. Narrow slits 6 are milled into one side of a transparent block 4. Slits 6 almost pass through the thickness of block 4 to form a multiplicity of separate compartments 9 of rectangular cross-section. The sides of slits 6 are left unpolished so that each compartment 9 is light tight.

In operation, punched card 1 is used as a mask and is placed on the unmilled surface of block 4. The milling is such that there is one compartment 9 for each hole position of card 1. Light source 3 illuminates card 1 from above. Light is transmitted through each hole 2 in card 1 into its associated compartment 9. The cross-sectional area of the compartment 9 illuminated is substantially larger than the area of a punched hole. A further mask 5 carrying a repetitive pattern is placed below block 4. A contact print of the light pattern received is taken on a photographic plate 8.

The pattern received on plate 8 is a representation of the information originally stored in punched card 1 which has been modified by mask 5. By multiple exposures and interchangeable masks, mixed patterns are produced so that the configuration representing each punched hole in a card is transferred into any desired two dimensional pattern. The photographic plate with the resulting pattern is used as a master negative for the production of printed circuits.

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