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Hot Glow Discharge Technique for Forming Thin Insulating Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096645D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DaSilva, EM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The method is used for depositing thin insulating polymer films onto substrate 1. This is positioned in vacuum chamber 3 which is evacuated along pipe 5 by a vacuum pump, not shown. The interior of chamber 3 communicates with monomer gas source 7 along inlet tube 9 and leak valve 11. Substrate 1 is positioned on holder 13 disposed above filament 15. Filament 15 is connected to AC source 17. Also, holder 13 and filament 15 are connected to opposite terminals of DC source 19. AC source 17 is operative to raise the temperature of the filament 15 to, e. g., 1600 degrees C.

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Hot Glow Discharge Technique for Forming Thin Insulating Films

The method is used for depositing thin insulating polymer films onto substrate 1. This is positioned in vacuum chamber 3 which is evacuated along pipe 5 by a vacuum pump, not shown. The interior of chamber 3 communicates with monomer gas source 7 along inlet tube 9 and leak valve 11. Substrate 1 is positioned on holder 13 disposed above filament 15. Filament 15 is connected to AC source 17. Also, holder 13 and filament 15 are connected to opposite terminals of DC source 19. AC source 17 is operative to raise the temperature of the filament 15 to, e. g., 1600 degrees C.

Monomer gas such as butadiene, methyl methacrylate, etc., from source 7 is introduced at a low pressure, e. g., 200 microns, into chamber 3. When DC potential is applied between holder 13 and hot filament 15, a glow discharge is introduced between them. Monomer gas in the glow discharge region deposits and polymerizes as a film onto substrate 1. Film deposition rates show linear dependence on filament current, since either heating effects or electron emission from hot filament 15, or both, accelerate the deposition process. Deposition rate, therefore, is controlled by filament temperature or by filament power input.

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