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Analog Ratio Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096725D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Comer, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

The network has an output signal representing the ratio between two input voltages of opposite polarity. A series of voltage dividers RA and RB are arranged in a parallel array. Each divider connects to the base input of a switching transistor T so as to switch each transistor at a different ratio. For example, voltage divider R(AI) and R(BI) causes transistor T1 to switch on whenever the absolute value of input voltage II is greater than 10% of input voltage I. Voltage divider R(A2) and RB2 causes transistor T(2) to switch on whenever input voltage II is greater than 20% of input voltage I, etc. In this manner, the number of transistors conducting is proportional to the ratio of the input signals.

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Analog Ratio Detector

The network has an output signal representing the ratio between two input voltages of opposite polarity. A series of voltage dividers RA and RB are arranged in a parallel array. Each divider connects to the base input of a switching transistor T so as to switch each transistor at a different ratio. For example, voltage divider R(AI) and R(BI) causes transistor T1 to switch on whenever the absolute value of input voltage II is greater than 10% of input voltage I. Voltage divider R(A2) and RB2 causes transistor T(2) to switch on whenever input voltage II is greater than 20% of input voltage I, etc. In this manner, the number of transistors conducting is proportional to the ratio of the input signals.

When a transistor T is switched on, it provides an output current through load resistors R(L) and R(S). Resistors R(L) are chosen so that the current from each conducting transistor is made to be the same. This is so that the total current through RS, and therefore the output voltage, is proportional to the number of conducting transistors and, hence, is proportional to the ratio of the input signals.

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