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Cathode Sputtering of Magnetic Thin Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096736D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Flur, BL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Forming magnetic thin films by cathode sputtering, for memory applications, requires the maintenance of a uniform temperature profile at the substrate. With an anode assembly that requires cooling, this is difficult to achieve. The difficulty, however, is overcome with a technique that avoids any direct thermal contact between the substrate and anode assembly.

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Cathode Sputtering of Magnetic Thin Film

Forming magnetic thin films by cathode sputtering, for memory applications, requires the maintenance of a uniform temperature profile at the substrate. With an anode assembly that requires cooling, this is difficult to achieve. The difficulty, however, is overcome with a technique that avoids any direct thermal contact between the substrate and anode assembly.

The assembly (left drawing) has cathode 10 which includes large heat sink 2 onto which a sheet of magnetic material 4, such as permalloy, is bonded. Heat sink 2 is a solid block of copper and is surrounded by cathode shield 6 which is maintained at ground potential. Coils 8 are provided about the cathode shield 6 for cooling.

Positioned approximately an inch away from cathode 10 is anode 12. This is a water cooled copper block, onto which substrate 14 for receiving the deposit is placed. Interposed between substrate 14 and anode 12 is a thin sheet of separating material 15 such as glass or mica. Sheet 15 isolates the substrate from the anode, preventing the removal of heat by direct conduction from the substrate to the anode and minimizing the opportunity for thermal gradients to exist. In this fashion, a uniform temperature profile is promoted on the substrate. An alternate procedure is to utilize glass pillars, in place of the sheet, (right drawing) to support substrate 17. Anode 12 is completed with inlets 16 and 18 which are provided for the transmission of water...