Browse Prior Art Database

Semiconductor Housing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096805D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Michelitsch, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Housings for semiconductor elements should exhibit a good heat dissipation and a low lead inductance. They should also permit an operation of elements which are often very sensitive. It is of special advantage if part of the manufacturing process for the semiconductor element takes place within the housing.

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Semiconductor Housing

Housings for semiconductor elements should exhibit a good heat dissipation and a low lead inductance. They should also permit an operation of elements which are often very sensitive. It is of special advantage if part of the manufacturing process for the semiconductor element takes place within the housing.

This housing consists of ceramic block 11 containing two conical recesses 13 and 13a and cylindrical recess 12. In recess 12, the finished semiconductor element 14, e.g., a tunnel diode having a PN junction 14a, is mounted by cementing. It is then ohmically contacted on both sides with metal layers 15 and 16 placed into recesses 13 and 13a. Layers 15 and 16 are conductively connected to metal plates 17 and 18, respectively. These serve as terminal contacts and for heat dissipation purposes.

It is, however, also possible to mount, instead of finished element 14, a bar or dot shaped semiconductor body in recess 12. It is then used for producing a tunnel diode by formation, contacting and, if necessary, etching processes. It is possible to produce in such housings semiconductor elements having three or more electrodes. In such cases, the housings consist of several alternating conductive and nonconductive regions, i.e., ceramic blocks and metal layers, respectively.

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