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Glottal Pulse Indicator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096826D
Original Publication Date: 1963-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nassimbene, EG: AUTHOR

Abstract

The circuit is used to detect the first peak of each series of voiced sound waves created by a glottal pulse. The vocal chords create a series of pulses of air called glottal pulses. Each resonates in the mouth and nasal cavities to provide a damped, transient oscillation of sound waves, called a vocal clap. The pitch of a person's voice is the number of vocal claps per second of his voice.

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Glottal Pulse Indicator

The circuit is used to detect the first peak of each series of voiced sound waves created by a glottal pulse. The vocal chords create a series of pulses of air called glottal pulses. Each resonates in the mouth and nasal cavities to provide a damped, transient oscillation of sound waves, called a vocal clap. The pitch of a person's voice is the number of vocal claps per second of his voice.

The circuit has RC network 10, single-shot multivibrator 11 and differentiating circuit 12. Capacitor 13 is charged rapidly by an input wave. Large resistor 14 causes the voltage across capacitor 13 to decay slowly. thus, a rapid rise is produced at capacitor 13 when the first peak of a vocal clap signal is received from the input microphone. Capacitor 13 then discharges slowly. For most sounds, it retains a sufficiently high voltage so that it is not charged by subsequent peaks of the same vocal clap.

Some sounds have a vocal clap waveform in which some of the subsequent peaks reach an amplitude greater than the then voltage of capacitor 13, charging it by a small amount. Since these false peaks occur within the first five milliseconds after a vocal clap begins, single-shot 11 is operated by the rapid charging of capacitor 13 upon the receipt of the first peak of the vocal clap. Single-shot 11 returns to its original state after a five millisecond period. Thus, it cannot be operated by any false peaks within the five millisecond period. Circuit 12 dete...