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Transistor Insertion Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096939D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Funari, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

The machine automatically inserts small-sized transistors in printed circuit boards by guiding by means of the leads rather than the tab on the can of the transistor.

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Transistor Insertion Machine

The machine automatically inserts small-sized transistors in printed circuit boards by guiding by means of the leads rather than the tab on the can of the transistor.

Rotatable turret 1 has removable magazines 2 containing oriented transistors
3. These are fed to chute 4 and pushed down it one by one by a revolving cam 5 on shaft 6. Chute 4 has a central straddle bar 7, to maintain the leads in oriented relation, and has an end stop.

A pair of gripper jaws 8 and 9 are pivoted at corresponding ends and have apertures 10 at the other ends for gripping the transistor leads. In retracted position, jaws 8 and 9 are biased away from the inserting head against the low side of cam 11 by spring 12. Jaws 8 and 9 are held apart against the low sides of cams 13 by springs 14. As cams 13 turn to their high sides, jaws 8 and 9 are clamped together with the transistor leads engaged in apertures 10. Cam 11 now turns to its high side, moving the transistor, clamped by jaws 8 and 9, off the end of chute 4 and beneath inserting head 15. The jaws are held together at this position by cams 16.

Inserting head 15 has a central bore 17 to which a vacuum is applied to pick up the transistor. Cams 16 rotate to allow jaws 8 and 9 to spread under the action of springs 14, releasing the transistor. The inserting head is now free to drive the transistor to the circuit board, driving straight down or turning through 180 degrees to accommodate reverse orientation of...