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Repeater Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096942D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callaghan, NM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Pulse shaping and voltage gain in excess of a two-to-one ratio are realized from the circuit. It employs tunnel diodes operable in a monostable manner.

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Repeater Circuit

Pulse shaping and voltage gain in excess of a two-to-one ratio are realized from the circuit. It employs tunnel diodes operable in a monostable manner.

An input transformer T, a pair of tunnel diodes D1 and D2 and a load coupling network are used. D1 is series-connected to the T secondary and is shunted by D2 at its output electrode. A current source, including a +V voltage supply and a resistor R1, is connected at A to a common junction of D1 and D2. A load circuit couples from the output terminal to A through the coupling network, including capacitor C for decoupling the load circuit and resistor R.

If insufficient series lead inductance is present, inductor L, having a small value, is included in the network. To insure that the diodes operate in monostable manner, the impedance of the load circuit is less than the D.C. valley resistance of D1 and D2.

In the initial condition of operation, D1 and D2 operate in stable low voltage states at a point near the peak current value. The operating point is determined by the current source. When an input pulse, having sufficient amplitude and a duration of approximately five nanoseconds, is supplied to the T primary, it is inverted by T and supplied to D1 as a negative current, causing it to switch to its high voltage state. The A potential rises sharply and, since the load is decoupled from the diodes, D2 is switched to its high voltage state.

After a delay approximating one nanosecond or less as determ...