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Tunnel Diode Delay Line Memory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096950D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stapper, CH: AUTHOR

Abstract

The delay line memory employs resistor-coupled, twin-tunnel diode circuitry to store information in the form of pulses. The circuit operates at high speed, with pulse biasing to isolate the input pulses from the output pulses. This prevents interaction between the input and output information.

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Tunnel Diode Delay Line Memory

The delay line memory employs resistor-coupled, twin-tunnel diode circuitry to store information in the form of pulses. The circuit operates at high speed, with pulse biasing to isolate the input pulses from the output pulses. This prevents interaction between the input and output information.

Tunnel diode D1 is connected in series with resistor R1 to the input transmission line. Resistor R2 is connected to shunt the D1 input terminal. Tunnel diode D2 shunts the D1 output terminal. The diodes are biased at common junction J by pulse source Ib, which is the clock source for the memory. D1 and resistors R1 and R2 as well as Ib establish the load line for D1. The V-I curve for D2 is indicated at A. The load line of D1 and R2, in the absence of an input signal or any diode bias, is indicated at B. During the period of a bias pulse but in the absence of an input signal, the load line of D1 and R2 is moved to C intersecting curve A at point X. Both diodes are in low voltage states. When an input signal is applied, the peak current values of both diodes are exceeded. Operation switches (curve D) to the high voltage states at the intersecting point
Y. An output signal is provided at the output transmission line. The diodes continue to operate in this condition so long as biasing continues. However, since pulse biasing is employed, the diodes revert back to their low voltage states at the end of a particular bias pulse. In this respect, the...