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Single Shot Oscillator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096953D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gersbach, JE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The tunnel diodes D1 and D2 have equal peak current values and connect with a resistor R1 in the base-emitter circuit of transistor inverter T. This circuit performs a single-shot operation. The connection of D1 and D2 enables each to control switching of the other. Both, in turn, control switching of T, dependent on the level of an input signal.

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Single Shot Oscillator

The tunnel diodes D1 and D2 have equal peak current values and connect with a resistor R1 in the base-emitter circuit of transistor inverter T. This circuit performs a single-shot operation. The connection of D1 and D2 enables each to control switching of the other. Both, in turn, control switching of T, dependent on the level of an input signal.

When the input signal is at ground, D1 and D2 are in low voltage states. T is nonconductive and the output level is at +Vc. As the input level rises to +V volts, D1 switches to its high voltage state, since the D1 peak current is the same as the D2 peak current and there is an impedance in parallel with D2. As D1 switches to the high voltage state, T turns on and the level of the output drops to a level below +Vc. Emitter current flows through the parallel combination of R1 and D2, increasing until it reaches a value equivalent to the D2 peak current plus the D2 peak voltage of over the value of R1. When this value is reached, the D2 peak current is exceeded and it switches to its high voltage state. Since there is insufficient voltage across both D1 and D2 to maintain both of them in their high voltage states, D1 switches back to its low voltage state turning T off. When the input level returns to zero, D2 returns to the low voltage state and a cycle is completed. The circuit is a free running oscillator, when the impedance relationship of D2 and R1 is varied.

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