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Friction-voicing Separator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000096957D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harper, TP: AUTHOR

Abstract

This device separates frictional sounds from voicing sounds according to differences in frequency or axis-crossing densities. This distinguishing feature is exemplified in the E(in) curve in which the sound wave is shown as it exists, electrically transduced, at point E(in), the input terminal of the circuit.

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Friction-voicing Separator

This device separates frictional sounds from voicing sounds according to differences in frequency or axis-crossing densities. This distinguishing feature is exemplified in the E(in) curve in which the sound wave is shown as it exists, electrically transduced, at point E(in), the input terminal of the circuit.

The frictional part of the input wave causes capacitor C1 to take on a more positive charge due to the positive going pulse, conducted through the forwardly biased diode D1. However, due to the short interval between these higher frequency pulses and to the chosen values of the components, C1 does not discharge to a substantial degree.

Since E is clamped to the negative value of A, capacitor C(2) assumes this positive charge and stores for a short period of time, rejecting the positive portions of the pulse.

When the input appearing at E(o) consists of the voicing portion of the wave, since this has a longer interval between pulses, C(1) now has sufficient time to go negative. This negative pulse is also stored by C(2) and, similarly, integrated in the negative direction due to the substantially higher time constant of C(2)R(2). This lower frequency wave also pulls C(1) in the positive direction, but allows it time to discharge to a negative value.

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