Browse Prior Art Database

Column Shifter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097007D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Paul, OT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The column shifting matrix is adapted for left or right shift operations and for ring shifting in either direction.

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Column Shifter

The column shifting matrix is adapted for left or right shift operations and for ring shifting in either direction.

The matrix consists of a plurality of square loop cores. These are arranged in columns, one for each bit position in the data to be manipulated, and in rows, one for each different number of bit positions that the data can be shifted. The matrix shown is capable of shifting a 4-bit word from zero to four bit positions in either direction.

Data to be shifted is entered by energizing the input lines A...D. Each input line which represents a binary one receives half select writing current. An additional half select current is applied to the one of the horizontal shift control windings 10...14, which represents the number of positions the data is to be shifted. Coincidence of the half currents on windings A... D and one of windings
10...14 sets the cores of one row to represent the input data shifted a predetermined number of positions. Assume, for example, that row winding 13 is energized with the input windings A... D. In this situation, the cores of the fourth row are set to represent, from left to right, input bits D, A, B and C. The bits in this order represent a ring shift of three positions to the left or a ring shift of one position to the right. If winding 13 is subsequently energized with full-select reading current, the input bits are read out on the vertical sense windings 1...4 in the order shown in the upper row of the table...