Browse Prior Art Database

High Speed Centrifugal Switch Jam Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097079D
Original Publication Date: 1962-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harrington, RH: AUTHOR

Abstract

A hollow idler roll 1 (left drawing) is biased by a spring, not shown, into contact with driven roll 2. Within idler roll 1 is a centrifugal switch including a pair of bifurcated contacts 3. Each contact is carried by a resilient arm 4 anchored by rivets 5 to roll 1. The fingers of each contact 3 are biased by arms 4 into contact with respective axially spaced contact rings 6 and 7 (right drawing). While roll 1 is being driven by driven roll 2, either directly or through an interposed single sheet 8, centrifugal force maintains contacts 3 disengaged from rings 6 and 7. However, if a jam occurs or if two sheets 8 move into the bite of rolls 1 and 2, roll 1 slows down, thus permitting contacts 3 to contact the rings 6 and 7. This completes a machine stop circuit through leads 9.

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High Speed Centrifugal Switch Jam Detector

A hollow idler roll 1 (left drawing) is biased by a spring, not shown, into contact with driven roll 2. Within idler roll 1 is a centrifugal switch including a pair of bifurcated contacts 3. Each contact is carried by a resilient arm 4 anchored by rivets 5 to roll 1. The fingers of each contact 3 are biased by arms 4 into contact with respective axially spaced contact rings 6 and 7 (right drawing). While roll 1 is being driven by driven roll 2, either directly or through an interposed single sheet 8, centrifugal force maintains contacts 3 disengaged from rings 6 and 7. However, if a jam occurs or if two sheets 8 move into the bite of rolls 1 and 2, roll 1 slows down, thus permitting contacts 3 to contact the rings 6 and 7. This completes a machine stop circuit through leads 9.

A plurality of these switches are disposed along the transport path. Leads 9 of each are connected in parallel to the stop circuit. Thus, the machine is stopped if any one of the fingers of contacts 3 contacts its respective ring 6 or 7. A normally open bypass circuit, not shown, is closed to enable the machine to start and permit disengagement of contacts 3 from their respective contact rings.

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