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Vacuum Evaporation Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097132D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ames, I: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Vacuum evaporation techniques are employed in the fabrication of high density thin film electrical circuits. Generally, one or more precision pattern masks are sequentially positioned adjacent a substrate, towards which volatilized material from an evaporation source structure is - directed. The material passes through the openings in the mask and is deposited upon the substrate in the required geometric configuration.

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Vacuum Evaporation Method

Vacuum evaporation techniques are employed in the fabrication of high density thin film electrical circuits. Generally, one or more precision pattern masks are sequentially positioned adjacent a substrate, towards which volatilized material from an evaporation source structure is - directed. The material passes through the openings in the mask and is deposited upon the substrate in the required geometric configuration.

During an evaporation operation heating of the mask, by radiant energy from the evaporation source, leads to a significant pressure rise in the area between the mask and substrate over the pressure existing in the remainder of the vacuum system. This pressure rise results from outgassing of the mask during an evaporation operation combined with the normally low gas conductance of the mask.

In order to prevent such a pressure rise in the volume between the mask and substrate, which increases the shadowing effect, it is only necessary to coat the surface of the mask adjacent the substrate with a thin film of an activated getter material such as titanium. Afterwards, during an evaporation operation, the getter material is effective to entrap gas molecules from this volume and maintain the pressure in it equal to or less than the pressure existing in the remainder of the system.:AB Further, additional getter material can also be deposited upon the substrate in those regions upon which the evaporated material is not to be depos...