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Measurement of Evaporated Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097170D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Petersen, HE: AUTHOR

Abstract

An electron gun emits an electron beam into leg A. A transverse magnetic field rotates the beam into leg B. Leg B is terminated by a mirror surface maintained at a potential which is negative with respect to the cathode by about 20 volts. Also shown above the mirror surface are ten equipotential lines, with the zero potential line being ideally (20/10,000)d from the inner face of the mirror. The electron velocity in leg B decreases as the mirror is approached and reverses at the zero equipotential. It then increases along the return path. The turning field deflects the beam into leg C to a phosphor faceplate for viewing.

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Measurement of Evaporated Films

An electron gun emits an electron beam into leg A. A transverse magnetic field rotates the beam into leg B. Leg B is terminated by a mirror surface maintained at a potential which is negative with respect to the cathode by about 20 volts. Also shown above the mirror surface are ten equipotential lines, with the zero potential line being ideally (20/10,000)d from the inner face of the mirror. The electron velocity in leg B decreases as the mirror is approached and reverses at the zero equipotential. It then increases along the return path. The turning field deflects the beam into leg C to a phosphor faceplate for viewing.

An evaporated thin film, which is electrically conductive, is used as the mirror surface at a suitable potential. As the electron beam nears the conductive surface, it is sensitive to variations in the electric field caused by surface irregularities in the deposited film or by areas where no conductive material is deposited. Alternatively, by passing a controlled current through the deposited film, the magnetic sensitivity of the electron mirror is utilized to detect variations in either the thickness or characteristics or both of the deposited film.

Thin insulating layers deposited on a uniform conductive layer can be examined. The application of an electrical potential to the conductive layer is then sufficient to cause defects in the dielectric layer to modify the electron beam pattern. Again, the insulating lay...