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High Voltage Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097191D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

The high voltage circuit incorporates NPN transistors Q1 and Q2 with their collector-emitter paths connected in series. The voltage output - from the circuit can be greater than the breakdown voltage of either transistor. As input current Is increases, the change in current is transferred through Q1 to Q2 and is transformed to a linearly decreasing voltage (slope 3a of E-I curve) across load resistor R2. Diode D1 is forwardly biased during this transformation so that Q2 operates as a common base transistor. When output voltage Eo becomes equal to the base voltage of Q2, it saturates and D1 is cut off dependent on the setting of R1. If D1 is not cut off, it is a low impedance for load current and notch 4 results. A further increase in Is causes a reduction in the current in D1 until it cuts off.

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High Voltage Circuit

The high voltage circuit incorporates NPN transistors Q1 and Q2 with their collector-emitter paths connected in series. The voltage output - from the circuit can be greater than the breakdown voltage of either transistor. As input current Is increases, the change in current is transferred through Q1 to Q2 and is transformed to a linearly decreasing voltage (slope 3a of E-I curve) across load resistor R2. Diode D1 is forwardly biased during this transformation so that Q2 operates as a common base transistor. When output voltage Eo becomes equal to the base voltage of Q2, it saturates and D1 is cut off dependent on the setting of R1. If D1 is not cut off, it is a low impedance for load current and notch 4 results. A further increase in Is causes a reduction in the current in D1 until it cuts off. Any further increase in Is causes a voltage change across Q1 with a resultant drop in output voltage Eo (slope 3b).

The E-I curve is a transfer characteristic of the relationship between the amplitude of voltage output Eo to the amplitude of current input Is. The slopes and the notch of the transfer characteristic are related to the variable parameters of the circuit and are indicated by like numerals. If resistor R3 is made infinite and the other variable parameters are appropriately adjusted, the notch width 4 is effectively eliminated and a high voltage circuit is provided. Under this circumstance, Eo can be equal to the sum of the breakdown voltage...