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Browse Prior Art Database

Superconductor Circuit Construction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097216D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lentz, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Heat dissipation is an important consideration in the design of cryogenic circuits. Where several circuits are positioned above each other, heat dissipation is aided by laying out the circuits so that no gating elements are positioned directly above each other.

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Superconductor Circuit Construction

Heat dissipation is an important consideration in the design of cryogenic circuits. Where several circuits are positioned above each other, heat dissipation is aided by laying out the circuits so that no gating elements are positioned directly above each other.

Furthermore, by making the superconductive shield which is associated with the conductors relatively small, the heat dissipation is further aided. Where a plurality of layers of circuitry are positioned above each other, the heat does not have to pass through several shields in order to reach the cooling medium.

The upper drawing shows two loop circuits on a substrate. The first loop circuit includes current paths 10 and 11 and cryotron gating elements 12 and 13 which have associated control elements 14 and 15. The second loop circuit includes current paths 21 and 22, gating elements 23 and 24 and control elements 25 and 26. Each conductor has a superconducting shield on each side of it.

The lower drawing shows an enlarged cross section taken along line indicated. Current paths 10 and 21 respectively include conductors 30 and 31 which are enclosed by shields 40 and 41.

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