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Film Resistor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097245D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mones, AH: AUTHOR

Abstract

To form a film resistor, a low-melting-point silver compound is, mixed with a palladium compound in a suspending medium such as mineral oil. Silver chloride, which has a melting point of about 455 degrees C, is a suitable silver compound while palladium chloride may be the palladium compound. Other low melting point silver compounds such as silver bromide or silver iodide can also be employed.

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Film Resistor

To form a film resistor, a low-melting-point silver compound is, mixed with a palladium compound in a suspending medium such as mineral oil. Silver chloride, which has a melting point of about 455 degrees C, is a suitable silver compound while palladium chloride may be the palladium compound. Other low melting point silver compounds such as silver bromide or silver iodide can also be employed.

The mixture is applied, by silk screening, to a substrate and is then fired at about 700 degrees C. The silver compound fluxes a reaction in which a resistive film of palladium oxide and a silver palladium alloy is forced on the substrate. The resultant resistor has a good frequency response to about 100 megacycles, a resistance in the range of kilohms per square, and a temperature coefficient of about 300 parts per million per degrees C.

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