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Browse Prior Art Database

Pulse Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097488D
Original Publication Date: 1962-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoffmann, CJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This echo pulse generator is used with recording systems in which current through a recording head is changed only when a binary 1 is to be recorded. The generator generates an echo pulse to insure that a binary 1 is in fact recorded. No echo pulse is generated under error conditions either if the head winding is shorted or open or if the write current is not sufficient.

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Pulse Generator

This echo pulse generator is used with recording systems in which current through a recording head is changed only when a binary 1 is to be recorded. The generator generates an echo pulse to insure that a binary 1 is in fact recorded. No echo pulse is generated under error conditions either if the head winding is shorted or open or if the write current is not sufficient.

Magnetic recording head 10 has an inductive coil for generating flux in accordance with the direction of current through it from a current source 11. A translating path is provided for a voltage pulse from junction 40 through resistor 19, phase splitting transformer 20 and rectifying diodes 21 and 22. The pulse output of the circuit at terminal 80 is produced by a normally saturated transistor 14 when it is rendered non-conductive by a pulse of predetermined magnitude. A level setting bias is applied to transistor 14 by the negative potential applied to resistor 16 which is connected to its base. Biasing for diodes 21 and 22 is provided through the action of transistor 23. The latter, under normal operating conditions is saturated, placing ground potential at the plates of diodes 21 and
22. When transistor 23 is rendered non-conductive, the voltage divider network consisting of resistors 25 and 26 places a negative potential at the plates of diodes 21 and 22. Such reversely biases these diodes to render them nonconductive and blocks transmission of pulses through them. The switch ...