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Detection of Leaks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097512D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Perri, JA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

For controlled detection of imperfect seals and moisture entry openings in hermetically sealed components such as transistor casings, it is desirable to enclose a clathrate compound containing an inert radioactive gas and later heat and sense the outer casing areas for radioactivity denoting escaping gas.

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Detection of Leaks

For controlled detection of imperfect seals and moisture entry openings in hermetically sealed components such as transistor casings, it is desirable to enclose a clathrate compound containing an inert radioactive gas and later heat and sense the outer casing areas for radioactivity denoting escaping gas.

A clathrate compound is one in which gases (usually inert, or noble gases) are physically trapped in a crystal lattice. The gas usually escapes slowly at room temperature but its rate of escape is accelerated by raising the temperature. For present purposes of component leak detection it is especially useful to exercise control over the timing of such heat application and thus test for leaks at a certain stage or stages of production and assembly, or even during or after component storage. This form of testing is adaptable to mass production techniques,

An example of a useful testing compound is krypton hydroquinone. Radiokrypton is a Beta emitter and such Beta rays are so low in energy that it is highly unlikely that they could affect the characteristics of an electronic component such as a transistor.

This radioactive testing method can be as much as 10, 000 times as sensitive as a mass spectrographic method. In cases where it is not possible to use a radioactive gas, the use of clathrate compounds in conjunction with mass spectrometry also offers the advantage of having a controllable source of gas within the component.

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