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Self Masking Semiconductor Junction Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097518D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marinace, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A process for quantity production of semiconductor junctions, known as the self masking semiconductor process, has been developed. The term self masking refers to the characteristic of this process of isolating areas of semiconductor substrate by means of pits or apertures, instead of introducing an additional device to achieve isolation. The method employs the process in which Ge (or other semiconductor) is deposited epitaxially from the vapor phase onto a monocrystalline Ge (or other semiconductor) substrate.

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Self Masking Semiconductor Junction Process

A process for quantity production of semiconductor junctions, known as the self masking semiconductor process, has been developed. The term self masking refers to the characteristic of this process of isolating areas of semiconductor substrate by means of pits or apertures, instead of introducing an additional device to achieve isolation. The method employs the process in which Ge (or other semiconductor) is deposited epitaxially from the vapor phase onto a monocrystalline Ge (or other semiconductor) substrate.

The pits or apertures are formed in the substrate by ultrasonic cutting, sandblasting, milling, etching or any other means of removing Ge. A pattern of pits is cut into the Ge substrate without piercing the substrate or a pattern of apertures is produced, if the substrate is pierced. A combination of pits and apertures may also be produced. The prepared substrate matrix is then etched to clean and remove strained surface layers.

After etching, the substrates have doped Ge epitaxially deposited upon them. The deposited Ge covers the entire surface of the substrate, including the pits and apertures, with a layer of Ge. This can be of a conductivity type opposite that of the substrate, thus creating a PN junction at the interface. Some applications might require that additional junctions be made in the deposited material itself. After the deposition, the faces of the substrate are lapped and etched until the deposit...