Browse Prior Art Database

Electrical Analog Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097658D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lovell, JE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The coupled delay lines, whose schematic circuits are shown at the top, provide a simulation of the fluid dynamic system shown below. Thus, by varying the parameters of the electrical analog apparatus it is possible to analyze the motion of the piston 10 in response to pressure impulses. These are applied to the input ducts 11 and 12 for a great variety of applied pulse configurations, initial piston rest positions, system geometries, and different fluids.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Electrical Analog Device

The coupled delay lines, whose schematic circuits are shown at the top, provide a simulation of the fluid dynamic system shown below. Thus, by varying the parameters of the electrical analog apparatus it is possible to analyze the motion of the piston 10 in response to pressure impulses. These are applied to the input ducts 11 and 12 for a great variety of applied pulse configurations, initial piston rest positions, system geometries, and different fluids.

In the delay line simulation, voltage waveforms corresponding to the applied pressure impulses are applied to the input terminals 20 and 21. The voltage response as a function of time is observed across the load inductances L(i). This latter voltage represents the acceleration of the piston 10 as a function of time. The relative delays of the upper and lower lines are proportional to the relativity of the distances d(1) and d(2). These define the initial rest position of the piston 10 with respect to the ends of the cylinder. Other electrical parameters are so chosen that the size of the inductors is proportional to the density of the fluid to be simulated. Also, the resistances are proportional to the absolute fluid viscosity and the inverse of the capacitance is proportional to the bulk modulus of the fluid. The coupling inductance L(l) is proportional to the mass of the piston
10. In addition to the proportionalities set forth, a scaling factor both as to amplitude and time is introd...