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Temperature Stable Voltage Comparing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097662D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dym, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

The voltage comparitor at the left, except for the back-to-back diodes employed at the ramp input, is identical to the temperature stable voltage comparitor previously described on page 139, this issue of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin.

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Temperature Stable Voltage Comparing

The voltage comparitor at the left, except for the back-to-back diodes employed at the ramp input, is identical to the temperature stable voltage comparitor previously described on page 139, this issue of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin.

In this voltage comparitor, the effect of the ramp input is to shift the load line as shown at the right. The amount of shift is increased by increasing the voltage or decreasing the input resistance.

Whenever the ramp input is larger than the analog voltage, the D. C. load line is shifted into the negative region. The diode is unstable and produces a series of output pulses. In some applications it is undesirable to have the diode oscillating. If only a single output pulse is required, this improved circuit is useful. Back to back diodes D1 and D2 are provided and their resistance variation is utilized. The load line for this circuit should not lie exactly on the peak, but a little before it. As the ramp voltage increases there is a ramp current, with a very small slope, in the diodes. As the ramp voltage approaches the analog voltage, the resistance of the diodes suddenly drops and the slope of the ramp current greatly increases. If the time constant of the inductor L1 and the series resistance is such that the current in the inductor cannot change as fast as the ramp current in the back to back diodes, the current in the Esaki diode only switches once. This is because, when the ramp v...