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Superconductive Commutator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097693D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, OT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The commutator employs a number of superconductive switching elements. It is effective to accept a short sampling pulse and develop a relatively long output pulse. The pulse amplitude is indicative of a selected condition being sensed.

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Superconductive Commutator

The commutator employs a number of superconductive switching elements. It is effective to accept a short sampling pulse and develop a relatively long output pulse. The pulse amplitude is indicative of a selected condition being sensed.

A number of sensing elements represented by generators E1, E2 and En having internal impedances R1, R2 and Rn are connected in parallel with gate conductors G1, G2 and Gn, respectively. Each of the latter is normally superconducting.

During circuit operation, a drive current Ic is supplied to a selected gate conductor. This switches to the resistive state and raises its temperature by I/2/R heating. Upon removal of the drive current, the gate remains resistive until its temperature falls below Tc. In this manner, current from the selected sensing element generates a voltage through the now resistive gate.

Additionally, the drive current is also supplied to a first control conductor of cryotron Kb. Its gate conductor is normally maintained resistive by current Ib flowing through a second control conductor associated with Kb. From the current directions shown, the drive current generates a magnetic field. This action effectively cancels the magnetic field generated by the current Ib. This gate becomes superconducting and shorts the input to the amplifier. It also prevents the relatively large voltage pulse, generated by the drive current flowing through gate G1, G2 or Gn, from being applied thereto.

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