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Glazing of Surfaces by Glass Formation in Situ

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097725D
Original Publication Date: 1961-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Maissel, L: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Alloys and chemical compounds may be formed by first evaporating or sputtering the individual components and then heat-treating the latter to create the alloys and compounds. A procedure which is usually more effective in making compounds involves evaporating or sputtering the materials onto a heated substrate. This affords an advantage in that the temperature of the hot substrate eliminates the need for a subsequent heat-treating step and the higher temperatures involved in that step. For example, when Mn and Bi are flash evaporated onto a hot substrate, they form a compound more rapidly and at a lower temperature than if a cool substrate and subsequent annealing are employed.

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Glazing of Surfaces by Glass Formation in Situ

Alloys and chemical compounds may be formed by first evaporating or sputtering the individual components and then heat-treating the latter to create the alloys and compounds. A procedure which is usually more effective in making compounds involves evaporating or sputtering the materials onto a heated substrate. This affords an advantage in that the temperature of the hot substrate eliminates the need for a subsequent heat-treating step and the higher temperatures involved in that step. For example, when Mn and Bi are flash evaporated onto a hot substrate, they form a compound more rapidly and at a lower temperature than if a cool substrate and subsequent annealing are employed.

Conventional glasses are made by fusing a mixture of oxides with one or more glass formers such as SiO(2), GeO(2), and B(2)0(3). In addition to the glass formers, modern glasses may contain one or more of the following oxides: PbO(2), Bi(2)O(3), A1(2)O(3), Na(2)O, CaO and ZnO. These materials are individually capable of being evaporated or sputtered or of being deposited by vapor-phase decomposition and oxidation. The simultaneous deposition of a mixture of such oxides onto a heated substrate forms glass at temperatures that are substantially lower than those required to produce the same glass in bulk since the components are so much more intimately mixed. Glass may therefore be formed in this manner on the surface of electrical components under conditi...