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Solar Cell Push-Pull Amplifier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097812D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bryson, BL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Two solar cells 1 and 2 are complemented for operating 180 degrees out of phase to drive a normally non-conducting transistor inverter 3. The specific cells are the output of an Optisyn unit and, ordinarily, do not supply a signal level sufficient to drive the current output of an activated well to turn the transistor alternately on and off. This condition occurs even if the transistor is selected to respond at low signal levels.

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Solar Cell Push-Pull Amplifier

Two solar cells 1 and 2 are complemented for operating 180 degrees out of phase to drive a normally non-conducting transistor inverter 3. The specific cells are the output of an Optisyn unit and, ordinarily, do not supply a signal level sufficient to drive the current output of an activated well to turn the transistor alternately on and off. This condition occurs even if the transistor is selected to respond at low signal levels.

In order to alleviate this problem, each cell 1 and 2 is provided with a bias network 4 and 5, respectively, for driving the output current of an activated cell in a direction sufficient to turn the transistor on or off. In the inactive state, reliance is placed on the fact that the solar cell is a reversely biased diode and, therefore, does not conduct in a forward direction during this period. Moreover, since the cells are 180 degrees out of phase, the networks are isolated from each other.

In operation, if it is assumed that the cell 1 is activated by an energy source, it supplies a current flow driven by the voltage of drive network 4, thereby activating the transistor. When cell 1 is deactivated and cell 2 is activated, the transistor is turned off. The current supply provided by cell 2, driven by network 5, assures that the transistor is in a non-conducting condition during this period. Thus, by utilizing networks 4 and 5, the cells 1 and 2 do not have to guarantee a voltage level for driving the curr...