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TCA Inverter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097816D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gruodis, AJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The provision of a tunnel diode D1 with the transistors T1 and T2 enables the circuit, which ordinarily operates as a modified emitter follower driving an inverter, to asynchronously operate as an inverter in response to ternary coded information. The inverter accepts three input voltage levels, ground, -V1 and -V2, defined as binary one, nothing and 0, respectively.

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TCA Inverter

The provision of a tunnel diode D1 with the transistors T1 and T2 enables the circuit, which ordinarily operates as a modified emitter follower driving an inverter, to asynchronously operate as an inverter in response to ternary coded information. The inverter accepts three input voltage levels, ground, -V1 and - V2, defined as binary one, nothing and 0, respectively.

The response of the circuit to a ground input (1) is such that both transistors T1 and T2 are rendered non-conducting and the output is pulled toward the -V voltage supply through the resistor R1. For a -V1 input (nothing), T1 is rendered conductive and T2 remains non-conducting. Since the current flow in the circuit is at a low level during this mode of operation, D1 remains in its low voltage state. The output voltage is below ground potential at a voltage determined by the drops across D1, T1 and conventional diode D2. When the input voltage is -V2
(0), T1 is turned on, conducting sufficient current to switch D1 into its high voltage state. The voltage across D1 is sufficient to forwardly bias the emitter- base junction of T2, rendering it conductive. The output voltage in this mode of operation is thus brought to ground potential. In order to maintain this output voltage level, sufficient input current must flow through the base of T1 keeping D1 in its high voltage state. In this operating condition, D2 prevents forwardly biasing the collector junction of T1.

The resistor R2 and the...