Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Amplifier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097916D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Parkes, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The optical assembly translates a mechanical rotation into an optical image rotation exhibiting a high angular gain. The device comprises a mechanically rotatable, inverting optical assembly and a non-inverting optical feedback system for returning the rotated image to the rotatable assembly.

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Optical Amplifier

The optical assembly translates a mechanical rotation into an optical image rotation exhibiting a high angular gain. The device comprises a mechanically rotatable, inverting optical assembly and a non-inverting optical feedback system for returning the rotated image to the rotatable assembly.

A dark object plate 10, having a transparent optical object formed on it, is illuminated by a light source 11. The object is projected onto reflecting surface 12 of rotatable assembly 13. The latter comprises the generally normally related reflecting surfaces 12 and 14 and is supported by bearings 15. Assembly 13 is rotated in the directions of the arrow 16 in response to mechanical drive signals. A pair of planar reflecting surfaces 17 and 18 are stationarily mounted with respect to 13 to define a closed optical feedback loop.

When 13 is rotated through an angular distance, the image of the object coming from surface 14 is effectively rotated through an angular distance which is twice as large. This rotated image is returned via optical path 19 provided by surfaces 17 and 18 to assembly 13 and serves as a new optical object. A second image is produced and is transferred via optical path 20 to screen 21. The second image is rotated through an angular distance which is four times the angular movement of 13.

The procedure is repeated as many times as desired so that the final image is rotated through a relatively large angular distance with only a small angul...