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Detecting Significant Points In Analog Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000097934D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Margopoulos, WP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Identification of significant peaks and troughs in analog data requires that data pertaining to each peak or trough be retained until point significance is determined. Three sets of analog data, one set containing significant peaks and troughs, are supplied over lines 1, 2 and 3 by a data source 4 reading prerecorded data. The three sets of analog data are converted in AD converters 5 into digital equivalents. Converter 5 includes for one set of data a G counter 6. This is maintained at the digital equivalent of the data on line 3 by addition and subtraction of pulses placed on a line 7 under control of the converter 5. The three sets of digital signals pass over lines 8, 9 and 10 to memory 11. This is activated by a signal on line 12 to store the sets of digital signals then present on 8, 9 and 10.

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Detecting Significant Points In Analog Data

Identification of significant peaks and troughs in analog data requires that data pertaining to each peak or trough be retained until point significance is determined. Three sets of analog data, one set containing significant peaks and troughs, are supplied over lines 1, 2 and 3 by a data source 4 reading prerecorded data. The three sets of analog data are converted in AD converters 5 into digital equivalents. Converter 5 includes for one set of data a G counter 6. This is maintained at the digital equivalent of the data on line 3 by addition and subtraction of pulses placed on a line 7 under control of the converter 5. The three sets of digital signals pass over lines 8, 9 and 10 to memory 11. This is activated by a signal on line 12 to store the sets of digital signals then present on 8, 9 and 10.

An inflection detector 13 receives the counting signals on line 7. Detector 13 signals when the direction of counting in 6 changes from up to down for a peak, or from down to up for a trough. For the determination of significant points to be recorded, a peak is the highest digital value following a recorded trough and afterwards having at least a predetermined decrease in value. A trough is the least value after a recorded peak and succeeded by at least a predetermined increase in value. To determine the significance of an inflection point located by 13, a bi-directional counter 14 is connected to add or subtract the G counter change signals on line 7. It is set to a maximum reading for a peak, and to a minimum reading for a trough, as indicated by the inflection signals from 13. The capacity of 14 is approximately equal to the predetermined rise or fall required after a significant point. Hence, overdrafting after a peak, or overflow after a trough, indicates that the last point is significant.

A sequence control 15 is responsive to both 13 and 14 to select the various modes in which the machine operates. In conjunction with the inflection detect...