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Browse Prior Art Database

Producing Magnetic Layers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098067D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Birkenbeil, HJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

The method is employed for the deposition of thin magnetic layers. These have reproducible and stable properties, as required for thin film memories, on substrates of high conductivity, e.g., by evaporation or cathode atomization.

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Producing Magnetic Layers

The method is employed for the deposition of thin magnetic layers. These have reproducible and stable properties, as required for thin film memories, on substrates of high conductivity, e.g., by evaporation or cathode atomization.

An electrically well-conducting, non-ferromagnetic metallic plate 11 is mechanically polished or rolled until the surface is extremely smooth and forms a Beilbyan layer. Next, there is applied to 11 a thin layer 12 of a second non- ferromagnetic metal with high melting point, preferably chromium.

During the deposition of the second metal, plate 11 is heated. The temperature is kept within certain limits, i.e., above approximately + 100 degrees C and below the recrystallization temperature of the second metal. There is next deposited an insulating intermediate layer 13, preferably of silicon dioxide. The last step is the deposition of the ferromagnetic layer 14. In order to produce a uniaxial anisotropy, the ferromagnetic layer is deposited in the presence of a D.
C. field.

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