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Thin Film Insulation In Superconducting Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098084D
Original Publication Date: 1961-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Meyers, NH: AUTHOR

Abstract

A serious problem in the fabrication of superconductive components and systems is superconducting shorts between adjacent superconductive layers. This is a result of holes and other defects occurring in the thin film insulating layer.

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Thin Film Insulation In Superconducting Systems

A serious problem in the fabrication of superconductive components and systems is superconducting shorts between adjacent superconductive layers. This is a result of holes and other defects occurring in the thin film insulating layer.

A technique for minimizing the effects of this problem is shown. A normal metallic layer is additionally interposed between the superconductive layers. Defects in the insulating layer, indicated at 1 and 2, are filled with atoms of the normal metal. This prevents the latter deposited superconductive material from contacting the previously deposited superconductive material at locations 1 and
2. The normal metal, which is resistive at the superconductive operating temperature, introduces ohmic resistance between the superconductive layers.

The resistive short appears as an open circuit under static conditions and causes the system switching speed to be reduced during dynamic operations. Further, the magnitude of the ohmic resistance introduced can be increased by applying a second insulating layer between the normal metal and the upper superconductive layer. This increased resistance results since, in general, defects in spaced layers do not line up one with another, thereby effectively increasing the length of the resistive path.

Finally, by applying a controlled potential between the superconductive layers at the superconductive temperature, the resistive path is selectively destroyed...