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Current Overshoot Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000098129D
Original Publication Date: 1960-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haddon, PE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This device detects when small sudden changes in the peak amplitudes of applied current pulses exceed a predetermined level. To that end, it is useful as a current overshoot detector. Its circuit comprises a pair of input terminals 10 connected to the series combination of an adjustable resistor 11 and a tunnel or Esaki diode 12. Input current pulses are applied to the terminals 10 while output voltage pulses are derived from a pair of terminals 13 connected to the diode. Resistor 11 has a resistive impedance which is much greater than that of the diode.

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Current Overshoot Detector

This device detects when small sudden changes in the peak amplitudes of applied current pulses exceed a predetermined level. To that end, it is useful as a current overshoot detector. Its circuit comprises a pair of input terminals 10 connected to the series combination of an adjustable resistor 11 and a tunnel or Esaki diode 12. Input current pulses are applied to the terminals 10 while output voltage pulses are derived from a pair of terminals 13 connected to the diode. Resistor 11 has a resistive impedance which is much greater than that of the diode.

Resistor 11 is adjusted so that the peaks of applied rectangular current pulses A, which are devoid of overshoot, cause the diode to operate at point A' of the current voltage characteristic of the diode 12. The magnitude of the derived output voltage B appearing at the terminals 13 for this condition is represented by the pulse in the upper voltage time curve.

When a small steep transient or overshoot C is superimposed on the current pulse A, as represented in the lower left hand figure, the peak amplitude of the pulse momentarily switches the operating point of the circuit to point C' until the transient has passed. The operation then continues at point D until the input pulse terminates.

There appears across the output terminals 13 a pulse D, as represented in the lower right hand voltage time curve, having an overshoot portion C. Thus, the circuit responds to a small sudden change i...